“Geschlossen Gotik”

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Anna 3 years, 3 months ago.

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January 15, 2014 at 11:31 PM #7159

Anna

koeiekat raised this subject in the thread about Tudoresque. Does anyone know its 19th-century tradename? It looks too “dainty” to be German, as the developer’s name implies. Geschlossen Gotik translates to “closed gothic.”


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January 17, 2014 at 5:20 AM #7169

koeiekat

Gothic-revival initials based on the 14th-century “closed letter” design (hence Altmark) — 1890.
See Dover Pictorial Archive Series: Early Advertising Alphabets, Initials and Typographic Ornaments. Edited by Clarence P Hornung. Dover Publications, Inc. 1956.
Also Dick Pape made a digital version (April 2009). Named it Gothic Closed Letter.


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January 19, 2014 at 1:58 PM #7178

Anna

KK, your history knowledge is amazing! Unfortunately, I don’t own a copy of Hornung’s book, so I didn’t know the history of this face—thanks SO much this valuable info. In my dreams… Does Hornung cite a bibliography documenting the TF that introduced this very interesting face in 1890?


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January 21, 2014 at 8:01 AM #7232

Anna

Hhmmm… What do you make of this specimen, KK? The Toronto TF catalog of 1899 proclaims that it is a distributor of ATF fonts (yadda-yadda), and the “drop cap” on the attached page illustrates the T of “Geschlossen Gotik.” Even so, no specimen of this face is displayed:

https://ia800301.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/3/items/cihm_90246/cihm_90246_jp2.zip&file=cihm_90246_jp2/cihm_90246_0005.jp2&scale=4&rotate=0

????


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January 23, 2014 at 3:51 AM #7249

koeiekat

No idea. Must have been popular.
Dan X. Solo has a shaded version named Zeus Initials in the Celtic and Medieval Alphabets book. Pages 90 and 91.


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January 24, 2014 at 2:36 PM #7277

Anna

Thanks for this great lead, KK! My note on these pages cross-references to Nesbitt’s Decorative Alphabets and Initials [plate 94]. His bibliography cites the specimen source as Alexander Zeese & Co., 1891. Zeese’s wares, including this face, were mostly electrotypes. He patented one design for a font of initials plus ornaments in 1880.


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