Santa Claus

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Anna 1 year, 6 months ago.

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November 24, 2013 at 11:06 PM #5362

Anna

Santa ClausThis irresistible pair of “fun faces” was introduced by Central TF in the December 1885 edition of The Inland Printer. A “patent pending” notice was displayed in at least one commercial specimen;¹ no such patent exists and none was claimed in the post-ATF catalog issued by the Central/Boston TFs in 1892.

According to policies of the US Patent and Trademark Office in effect at the time, Santa Claus was positively “new, novel and non-obvious” and absolutely worthy of a design patent. No approved applications for design patents were filed by Central executives nor assigned by others after 1886. Apparently this notice was of the “beware of the (non-existent) dog” variety.

The designer is unknown. William E. Loy does not account for Santa Claus in his biographies of Gustave F. Schroeder nor Nicholas J. Werner, Central’s staff type designers/punch-cutters until 1889, when they partnered an independent business. In 1891, Schroeder moved to California; he and Werner continued to contract design commissions from Central and other clients.²

Preliminary Specimensflickr images

Glyph Audit
Initials. Complete (hard-copy scan)
Caps. Missing J, Q, Z
Lower Case. Missing j, q, v
Numerals and Punctuation. Missing 5; complete except colon and semi-colon
Ligatures and Ornaments. Abundant(!), cute(!) and (presumably) complete
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¹Mullen, R.A. (2005): Recasting A Craft|St. Louis Typefounders Respond To Industrialization, page 139. Southern Illinois University Press, Carbondale.
²Loy, W.E. (1898–1900): Designers and Engravers of Type. In The Inland Printer, December 1898 (Schroeder) and August 1899 (Werner).


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December 13, 2013 at 12:35 PM #6404

Alan Jay Prescott

I have a Petzendorfer showing of complete set of caps and numerals in Santa Claus Open, no lower case.


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December 14, 2013 at 6:53 AM #6422

Anna

The Petzendorfer specimen is only the initials (viewed over 1,000 times at flickr!). Besides it, I have only the commercial ones in the flickr set. BTW the last one (Hawks & Shattuck 1889) was originally printed on color paper, so it’s tough to work with.

I’ll upload a zipfile of everything I’ve found to your dropbox folder. This face has incredible appeal, huh? Given its flickr popularity, I have a good feeling that it could be a big winner!


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April 18, 2014 at 9:45 AM #8347

Anna

Santa Claus Glyph Checklist

SantaClaus Checklist


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August 12, 2015 at 4:38 AM #23185

Anna
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October 25, 2015 at 1:33 PM #25560

Alan Jay Prescott

I have started to revive Santa Claus. There are more glyphs than maybe anyone realized. There are a great many alternates for mostly the lowercase characters: a, e, h, i, l, m, n, o, s, t, w so far. Those are the ones I found in Inland Printer Journey, and there may be others that I will keep an eye out for. This is a deceptively difficult revival, in that it is a casual outline letterform whose inner and outer rims are actually different from each other, not a simple expansion from an average path. And different point bodies were, of course, drawn a little differently. I will use the 18-point specimen as the default, most likely. And the Initials are a different set of drawings. Thanks for the great specimens, but the resolution of some of them means that this revival will be slightly conceptual.


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October 27, 2015 at 1:18 AM #25569

Anna

Wonderful news—Santa Claus is SO adorable! What makes it extra-cute is those tricky irregular inner and outer edges, not to mention the extensive alternates and ornamental glyphs.

It is bound to be a Big Hit! Some of the flickr images have been viewed 3,000+ times by now.


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