Unknown Tradenames

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This topic contains 20 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Anna 1 year, 3 months ago.

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September 16, 2015 at 11:59 AM #23946

jch02140

I have a bunch of specimens without names and would be great if anyone able to ID them.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/gar28m3fwilxazq/AAAi3XXHpGVsa9B3fxBRymUCa?dl=0


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September 17, 2015 at 12:48 AM #23952

Anna

Hi jch02140,

You need a copy of Dan X. Solo’s Catalog!¹ Most of the fonts you are wondering about are identified by some 300 brief specimens in the 17-page “Victorian” chapter. Many have been digitized—some by Chapel Members, who usually choose fonts that have not been revived before.

Thank you for these beauties! Both are good candidates for revival. I will research and write topics about them soon…

Corinthian, not shown by Solo. McGrew 342.

img2Auroral, Solotype 64. OUCH—that ray shading looks mean!

P.S. The Derriey specimen is Ihlenburg’s Columbian#, one of four MSJ faces he designed for the Columbian Exposition (Chicago World’s Fair, 1892) celebrating the 400th anniversary of Christoper Columbus’ voyage. The other three were named for the Italian explorer and his patrons, the King and Queen of Spain: Columbus#, Ferdinand# and Isabella#.
____

¹Solo, D.X. (1992): The Solotype Catalog of 4,417 Display Typefaces, pages 9-26/94-111. Dover Publications, Inc. (Minneola, NY).

 


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September 17, 2015 at 11:25 AM #23988

jch02140

Hi Anna,

Thanks for the info about the book. I will check it out.
Also, thanks to ID three of the typefaces.

Best Regard,
jch02140


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September 19, 2015 at 11:21 PM #24092

George

@jch02140 — I found the one Anna calls Auroral under the name “Reflection” in Phillips’ Old Fashioned Type Book. It shows a 24pt complete alphabet, (caps, numbers and points). There is one minor difference: your sample shows a different /M, but it likely is an alternate since the one I have shows an /N in the same style and a normal style of /M. I also found a Light version under the name “Astral“; it includes a lowercase. If you want a scan, let me know.


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September 20, 2015 at 12:13 AM #24097

George

@anna and @jch02140 — I uploaded to Dropbox some of the IDs wanted. They are all shown in Phillips’.
http://tinyurl.com/qdskev5


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September 20, 2015 at 9:26 AM #24155

Anna

Thanks (a million!) to George’s input, a separate topic on Auroral|Astral|Elberon has been researched and launched.


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September 20, 2015 at 4:47 PM #24172

jch02140

@George

Thank you for identifying some of the metal types.
Just curious, does the Phil’s book also have showing for these three types: Old Lace, Philadelphian, June?

Thanks again for the help.


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September 20, 2015 at 7:49 PM #24174

George

@jch02140 — I forgot to mention: Bowl and Spread have already been digitized. Bowl was done under that name. Spread was digitized by Alan Prescott but he called it by another name.

I see the name Philadelphian but it may or may not be the one you desire. The other two don’t appear under their respective names but they could still be there.

FYI, in case you are interested. Last night there were eight (8) copies of the Phillips’ book available on abe.com at prices ranging from in the $60’s to over $100US. The full name is Phillips’ Old Fashioned Type Book and was printed in 1945. It’s a great resource for the old types. abe.com is a used-book collaborative owned by Amazon with sellers from all over the world.


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September 20, 2015 at 10:07 PM #24175

George

@jch02140 — One more: the script is, I believe, Bond Script.


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September 21, 2015 at 1:53 AM #24196

jch02140

@George

Thank you for the information.
I have upload the one line specimen of Old Lace and Philadelphian. Can you confirm again if they are in the Phil’s old fashion book?

Thanks again for all the help.


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September 21, 2015 at 9:49 PM #24215

Robert

The following type specimens are as follows:
Image 1. Ancient Text – This was shown in 1900 A. D. Farmer & Sons type specimen book. it was and still may be available at Fonts.com.

Image 3. Attic – Attic was cast by MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan around 1879 or later, in a sense it is a lighter weight version of Campanile. Attic was digitized by Peter Wiegel as a free font.

Image 4. Sloping Black – Sloping Black was cast by MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan in 1869. Sloping was digitized by Fontmesa and Gerhard Helzel.

Image 5. Bijou – Bijou was designed by Herman Ihlenburg and cast by MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan

Image 6. Bizarre – Bizarre was cast by MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan in the 1884, it was digitized in the 1990’s as Line Drive by Ingrimayne Type and is available at Myfonts.com.

Image 7. Constantine – Constantine was cast by Farmer, Little & Co. This font has not been digitized. There is a full alphabet showing in the Phillips; Old-Fashioned Type Book.

Image 10. Rosella – Originally called Ornamented No. 1053 and cast by Bruce’s New York Type Foundry.

Image 11. Card Gothic was cast by Farmer, Little & Company in 1883, this one has been digitized.

Image 13. Card Text – Card Text was cast by MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan in 1867 it is also
known as Elongated Anglo-Saxon by H. W. Caslon Letter Foundry and was still shown in this
as last as 1915.

Image 14. Cabalistic – Cabalistic was cast by MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan in 1879.

Image 15. Glorietta – This one was known as Columbian and was cast by MacKellar, Smiths & Jordan in 1891. It was renamed Gloretta by the late Mr. Dan X. Solo since he had other typefaces that were named Columbian.

Image 16. Spread

Image 17. Congress – Congress was cast by the H. C. Hansen Type Foundry in 1908 or 1909. It was digitized by OptiFonts Castcraft which their website is no more but some of their fonts including this one are at abfonts.com.

Yours truly,
Robert


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September 21, 2015 at 10:21 PM #24216

George

Philadelphian is there, shown on page 34 except it is missing punctuation and numerals 6 through 0. Old Lace is not in the book.


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September 22, 2015 at 5:15 PM #24303

jch02140

Thanks to both George and Robert for identifying the unknown types.

@George I can’t seem to find the digitized Bowl. Is it available as a free download or as a commercial purchase in sites like MyFonts?

@Robert About the OptiFonts, I think there is an archive site where most, if not all of their fonts are available for download.


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September 23, 2015 at 12:13 AM #24305

Anna

A caps-only revival of Bowl was produced specifically for The Type Heritage Project textbook series. Here is a gallery specimen preview showing it with other “footed latins.” The anonymous developer intends to add the lower-case and may decide to sell it at the bazaar site. I doubt that any other version is commercially available.


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September 23, 2015 at 1:22 AM #24310

Anna

@jch02140

About the OptiFonts, I think there is an archive site where most, if not all of their fonts are available for download.

The link you are looking for—and many more very helpful ones for research and revival-collecting purposes—will be found on the page entitled “THP Colleagues.” Have fun exploring it!


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September 25, 2015 at 6:06 AM #24384

Anna

@jch02140

Amazon previews of the Solotype Catalog. You (and everyone seeking tradenames of 19th-century typefaces) REALLY need this indispensable book!

My own copy of this 238-page “bible” literally fell apart years ago—the index pages are so worn that they must be protected with sheet covers. Now I store it in a loose-leaf binder for almost daily reference. I can’t possibly replace it because it is a “hub” of handwritten notes cross-indexing digital revivals, other specimens and historical information.

Please remember that when he acquired type whose tradenames were unidentified, numbered, learned later or conflicted with others in his collection, Mr. Solo named or renamed them accordingly. Because of his highly influential Dover publications, countless revival faces are known today by the tradenames he assigned to them.

Please “do yourself a favor” and invest in this resource!


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September 28, 2015 at 6:31 AM #24449

jch02140

I have upload a couple more specimens into my dropbox folder. They have already been named so no identification needed, but will temporary stop creating any more topics about the typefaces for now until the bazaar site is completed…


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October 6, 2015 at 7:57 AM #24876

Anna

Exciting news about Corinthian!


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October 8, 2015 at 11:51 AM #24936

jch02140

@George

Just wondering, are there other books like the Phil’s Old Fashion Book that shows complete characters of the 19th-centuries typefaces (mostly from metal/wood types)?

Jch02140


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January 13, 2016 at 7:25 AM #26469

jch02140

Anyone knows any info on the following attached typefaces?


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January 13, 2016 at 10:55 PM #26473

Anna

Hi Johney,

Sorry, I don’t recognize No 1 nor the tradename. Maybe it’s an ornamented derivative of a common sans serif—Robert may have the answer.

MalteseDual-case Maltese and M. Open were patented (single application) by a mysterious Paul Grey (Chicago) in September–November 1878 [USPTO D10898] and attributed by William E. Loy to C.E. Heyer, who apparently cut them. They were perhaps the first original introductions by Barnhart Brothers & Spindler.

In due course, they will be added to the Wish-List Chart linking to this topic. Please don’t “hold your breath” for a revival because available patent and commercial specimens are not good… Even so, THP partner geniuses are known to “spin straw into gold” [Grimm’s Fairytales, Rumplestiltskin]—one never knows what they can do with a mere suggestion of the original designer’s intent!

Best regards, Anna


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